Harries Flashlight Technique

This technique is named after Michael, a pioneer of modern practical combat shooting. The most popular of the hands-together techniques, the Harries Flashlight Technique was developed in the early ’70s for use with large-bodied “police flashlights.”

The Harries Technique was embraced by Col. Jeff Cooper and became the predominant technique taught at Cooper’s famed shooting school, Gunsite. It is widely used today and is well-suited to small flashlights.

To employ the Harries Technique, the flashlight is held in an ice pick grip with the reflector, or lens, on the side opposite the thumb. The thumb or finger operates the on/off switch, whether it is a tactical tailcap like on a SureFire CombatLight or a body-mounted button. The shooter’s wrists nest together and the backs of the hands are firmly pressed together to create stabilizing isometric tension. For large flashlights, the body of the flashlight may be rested on the shooting hand’s forearm.  (Michael is seen here demonstrating the technique with his beloved icon “Elvira” in the backround.)

OPEN QUESTION TO BILL JOHNSON:

Where is Michael’s flashlight technique manuscript. You have had it for 14 years, ever since you, Bob Dohrman and the coward Brian Simmons cleaned out Michael’s home of all his guns etc. Plus the property of others.

GIVE IT TO US SO WE CAN GET IT PUBLISHED!! DO IT NOW!! CONTACT US HERE!!